The History and Archaeology of Thanksgiving

On this episode, Chelsi, Kirsten, and Emily chat about the history and archaeology of the Thanksgiving holiday. What was the original harvest celebration all about? Were the Pilgrims an absolute bummer? What are our misconceptions about this holiday? What can archaeology tell us about the relationship between the Pilgrims and indigenous communities? The hosts also... Continue Reading →

Engaged Archaeology Book Review and Interview

Join Emily Long and Kirsten Lopez as we bring in two of the editors of "Engaged Archaeology in the Southwestern U.S. and Northern Mexico," Dr. Sara Herr and Dr. Kelley Hays-Gilpin, to discuss their new book. We discuss how archaeologists can create an engaged archaeological practice. We explore what engaged archaeology is, what that means... Continue Reading →

The PERIOD Episode – Repost

This episode originally aired on December 10, 2017 - Enjoy! On this episode we discuss PERIODS! A lot of us have them, they can be really inconvenient, and dealing with them in the field is often less straightforward than normal. We discuss pros and cons of the various products on the market, how to deal... Continue Reading →

The Archaeology Tools Guide

By Chelsi Slotten Archaeologists use a lot of different tools when excavating. These will differ depending on the geographical area you are working in, the site conditions, and the type of archaeology you are doing.  For example, a lot of bioarchaeologists (aka archaeologists who study bones) have dental picks in their toolkit, which other archaeologists... Continue Reading →

UK Archaeology Has a Problem

By Chelsi Slotten As I’m sure many of you have heard by now, UK archaeology has a problem. Departments at Sheffield, and Chester are under threat of closing and the government wants less “red tape” around construction projects. This is code for removing archaeology requirements before digging. These are alarming trends. Furthermore, major projects are... Continue Reading →

Harriet Boyd Hawes: A Tale of Two Cities

By Kari Fossum The Homeric Question On the Mediterranean island of Crete, 1900 marked something more than just the start of a new century: it was also the year in which the crew employed by British archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans broke ground at Knossos. This site would, within a few months, yield the now-famous ‘Palace... Continue Reading →

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